20 Eco-Friendly Tips to Reduce Your Impact on the Environment

Earth

Earth Day was founded in 1970 by Senator Gaylord Nelson.  (Photo credit: Loskutnikov/Shutterstock)

April 22 marks the 49th annual celebration of Earth Day. Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin founded Earth Day in 1970 to bring environmental issues to the top of the national agenda. Until then, there were little to no legal or regulatory mechanisms to protect the environment. [Read more…]

Botanic Gardens Help Protect Threatened Plant Species

botanic garden

Botanic gardens are home to a large percentage of threatened plant species. (Photo credit: ©Wikimedia Commons)

While botanic gardens might seem like just a pretty or relaxing place to visit, it turns out they hold a very important role in the global conservation and preservation of threatened and endangered plant species. However, some researchers think botanic gardens should be taking an even bigger part in ensuring that threatened and endangered plant species are protected from extinction. [Read more…]

Not So Rosy: The Environmental Cost of Flowers

flowers for sale

Have you ever considered the environmental cost of a bouquet of flowers? (Photo credit: Creatas/Jupiterimages/Getty Images)

Flowers are an important part of many cultures. They are used at ceremonies and holidays, and given to honor someone for a significant achievement or for his or her special day. Many people buy flowers to mark an occasion or simply to decorate their homes without giving a thought about where the blooms came from. What is the environmental cost of flowers?

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Wax Worm Caterpillars Have a Taste for Plastic

wax worm

Scientists have discovered that wax worms (Galleria mellonella) can digest plastic. (Photo credit: Kuttelvaserova Stuchelova/Shutterstock)

Federica Bertocchini’s discovery that wax worms can eat through plastic happened completely by accident. Bertocchini, an amateur beekeeper, was dismayed to find that her beehives were infested by wax worm caterpillars. After cleaning out the hive, she went to pick up the plastic bags she had placed the pests in, only to find the bags riddled with holes.   [Read more…]

Go Green When You Clean

natural cleaners

You can make natural cleaning products from simple ingredients you probably already have in your home. (Photo credit: HMH)

We live in a chemical-filled world. Check the label of almost any household product and you will find a long list of hard-to-pronounce chemical names. While these ingredients might make these products effective cleaners, the toxic chemicals they contain could have deleterious affects on human health. Even fetuses are exposed to chemicals in the womb. One study that tested the infant umbilical cord blood found that babies were exposed to over 200 environmental chemicals before they have even been born.

In most cases, household cleaners aren’t required to list specific ingredients on their labels. Consumers who are interested in what they are spraying and wiping around their homes have to track the ingredients down with phone calls to the company that made them or searches of product websites.

Today, consumers are expressing an increased interest for eco-friendly products and are voting with their spending dollars by buying products that are labeled as safer for the environment, or “green.” But did you know that you can make your own natural cleaning products using a few simple ingredients you likely already have in your home? A walk down the cleaning product aisle at any store might make you think that you need a different product for each surface and each room of the house, but this is not true. Many of the same ingredients can be used to clean multiple surfaces. Making your own cleaning products will help you to have cleaner, safer home environment and it will save your family money, too.

Cleaning Windows: A simple recipe of white distilled vinegar and water is all that is needed to clean windows.  Just add 1 tablespoon of vinegar to a quart of water. If the windows require a more powerful cleaner, you can add more vinegar, up to a solution of half vinegar, half water. Even undiluted vinegar can be used in areas where there are tough spots from hard water. The smell of vinegar will disappear shortly after you spray it, but if a fresh scent is preferred, lemon juice can be added.

Polishing Furniture:  A quick natural way to make furniture polish is to put the juice of a lemon into a bowl or container, add one teaspoon of water, and one teaspoon of olive or vegetable oil. Use a soft cloth to lay a thin layer of the mixture onto wood furniture, and then let it sit for a few minutes. Then use a clean dry cloth to both buff the mixture in and remove the excess from the furniture. This mixture will not keep, so make sure to mix up only as much as you will use immediately. Unlike most store-bought furniture polish, it is safe to discard any remaining mixture down the sink.

Deodorizing Rugs:  A quick, easy, and cheap way to remove odors from carpets and rugs is to sprinkle baking soda generously on them. Leave the baking soda on the carpet for at least fifteen minutes, and then vacuum it up. The baking soda will absorb the odor. If you are trying to neutralize a strong odor, sprinkle the baking soda on, use a broom to work it in to the carpet, and then sprinkle more baking soda on top. Leave up to two days if possible. When it is time to clean it up, first use a stiff broom to collect the top layer in a dust pan. Then vacuum up the rest. Vacuuming up a lot of baking soda could damage your vacuum.

Cleaning the Toilet Bowl:  Like cleaning carpets, baking soda is also good for cleaning toilet bowls. Baking soda is mildly abrasive, so it is good for anything that requires scrubbing – from teeth, to pots and pans, to toilet bowls. For toilets, sprinkle the baking soda in the bowl, and use a toilet brush to scrub. For a cleaning solution that has foaming action, a little vinegar can also be added.

More to Explore
Alternatives to Hazardous Household Products
Homemade Non-Toxic Household Cleaners
The Best Non-Toxic Ways to Clean Your Home

Front Yard Gardens Growing in Popularity

edible yard

Vegetable gardens are no longer relegated to the backyard. (Photo credit: Mark A Johnson/Alamy)

Home gardening has grown greatly in popularity over the past five years. According to research gathered by the National Gardening Association, 42 million households grow food at home or in a community garden. The greatest surge in home gardeners is among millennials (those between 18 and 34 years of age); over the past five years, food gardening among this age group has increased 63 percent. [Read more…]

The Environmental Impact of Plastic Bags

plastic bags in trees

A huge number of plastic bags are used each year. A large proportion of them end up as litter. (Photo credit: bikeriderlondon/Shutterstock)

“Paper or plastic?” is a common question heard at the checkout line. Though the environmental impact of paper versus plastic bags continues to be debated, perhaps the best answer is “I’ve brought my own.” [Read more…]

Are We in a New Epoch? The Case for the Anthropocene

freeway

The proliferation of concrete on Earth’s surface is one piece of evidence scientists suggest supports the designation of a new epoch called the Anthropocene. (Photo credit: UpperCut Images/Alamy)

The Holocene Epoch began around 12,000 years ago. Are we now in the Anthropocene? In a recent study published in Science magazine, some scientists argue that we indeed have entered a new epoch. [Read more…]

Solar Power Savings

solar panels

Switching from coal to solar power could save thousands of lives, according to new research. (Photo credit: Digital Vision/Getty Images)

Transitioning from coal to solar power in the United States could prevent the premature death of nearly 52,000 Americans annually, according to a study recently published in the journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews.

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A Closer Look at the Environmental Consequences of Fracking

wastewater from fracking

This containment pond holds contaminated water produced by the fracking process. (Photo credit: Dwight Nadig/E+/Getty Images)

While not exactly a new technology, fracking (which is short for “hydraulic fracturing”) has been a common topic in the news recently. Fracking is known both for its potential to ease U.S reliance on foreign sources of energy and for its possible adverse effects on the environment, which scientists now think include the potential for starting earthquakes.
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