The Sloths of Costa Rica

Costa Rica sloth

Sloths are found throughout Costa Rica’s tropical forests. (Photo credit: Kjersti Joergensen/Shutterstock)

With their shy, seemingly secret-hiding smiles, languid movements, and unique habits, the sloth fits the basic description of a charismatic animal to a T. [Read more…]

Protecting the Fisheries of Belize

Belizean fisherman

Managed Access zones have greatly improved sustainable fishing activities in the Caribbean waters surrounding Belize. (Photo credit: Witold Skrypczak/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images)

The Central American country of Belize, which shares its eastern border with the Caribbean Sea, is well known for its coral reefs and abundant marine life. Belize is a major exporter of lobster, conch, and shrimp and the fisheries industry is a top contributor to the nation’s economy. However, in recent years, open-access fishing has led to a significant decline in overall yield. New fishery management techniques are proving successful in both preventing overfishing and empowering local fishers within the territories they fish. [Read more…]

The Tree Goats of Morocco

goats in argan tree

These Moroccan goats have an important role in the extraction of argan oil, a precious commodity. (Photo credit: Yavuz Sariyildiz/Alamy)

While goats are well-known for their ability to jump over fences and scale great heights, a certain population of goats in southwestern Morocco takes their climbing skills to a whole new level. [Read more…]

Sweden’s Dedication to Sustainable Living

solar power in Sweden

Solar power is just one aspect of Sweden’s sustainable development initiatives. (Bohner Images/Getty Images)

Sweden has consistently been ranked as one of the most sustainable countries in the world for several years in a row. How has this Scandinavian country embraced sustainable living? [Read more…]

India’s Tiger Sanctuaries

Bengal tigers

As of 2014, the worldwide population of Bengal tigers numbered 2226. (Photo credit: Swapan Photography/Shutterstock)

Over a century ago, more than 100,000 Bengal tigers roamed India. Today, there are just over 2200. What caused such a drastic drop in numbers? And what can be done to save the Bengal tiger from extinction? [Read more…]

The 411 on Fjords

(Photo credit: Stefan Auth/imagebroker RF/Photolibrary)

Fjords are a spectacular part of the Norwegian landscape. (Photo credit: Stefan Auth/imagebroker RF/Photolibrary)

Fjord is a Norwegian word describing a long, narrow inlet of water with steep cliffs on either side. Norway has the world’s highest concentrations of fjords. [Read more…]

Cameroon’s Mysterious Crater Lakes

(Photo credit: Harri's Photography/Flickr Open/Getty Images)

Though picturesque, some crater lakes hide a deadly secret. (Photo credit: Harri’s Photography/Flickr Open/Getty Images)

August 21, 1986 started out as a normal day near Cameroon’s Lake Nyos. By the end of the day, however, 1746 people and 3500 livestock in the area would be dead. The cause of the catastrophe was, of all things, an exploding lake. But what caused the lake to explode? More importantly, could it happen again? [Read more…]

Harnessing Earth’s Energy in Iceland

Iceland geothermal plant

Geothermal energy is a significant part of Iceland’s renewable energy program. (Photo credit: naten/Shutterstock)

Iceland is known for its dramatic fire and ice landscape. Visitors come from all over the world to soak in the island nation’s thermal pools, which are heated naturally by underground plumes of magma. However, this geothermal energy is harnessed for more than just recreational purposes – it is also used as an important source of renewable energy in the country and even beyond its borders.   [Read more…]

Gwynt y Môr Wind Farm

wind turbines

Gwynt y Môr is the second largest offshore windfarm in the world. (Photo credit: philipbird123/Fotolia)

Gwynt y Môr (which translates to “wind of the sea” in English) is the second largest offshore wind farm in the world. It is located about 13 kilometers (8 miles) off the coast of north Wales near Colwyn Bay and covers an area of 80 square kilometers (about 30 square miles). [Read more…]

The Plight of the Tasmanian Devil

Tasmanian devil

Tasmanian devils are currently threatened by a cancerous facial disease. (Photo credit: ©FiledIMAGE/Shutterstock)

Tasmania, an island located off the southeastern coast of Australia, is home to the Tasmanian devil. Unlike the human adult sized cartoon version, the real Tasmanian devil is only 20-31 inches (51-79 cm) tall and weighs between 9 and 26 pounds (4-12 kg).

While fossil evidence indicates that Tasmanian devils were once found on the Australian mainland, research indicates that the animals went extinct there 400 years ago due to increasingly arid conditions and the spread of the dingo, a type of wild dog. Tasmanian devils were nearly hunted to extinction on Tasmania during the late 1800s and early 1900s as they were considered to be pests by early settlers. The animals were placed under formal legislative protection in June 1941.

Though the Tasmanian devil bears no resemblance to its cartoon counterpart, it does share its terrible disposition. When the animal feels threatened, its puts on an aggressive display of growling, lunging, and baring its teeth. It earned its “devil” name from early settlers after hearing its “otherworldly” scream. However, while it may be aggressive to potential predators, Tasmanian devils tend to be fairly timid and are typically not a threat to people.

Tasmanian devils are nocturnal animals, which means they are active at night. They are carnivorous and generally feed on birds, snakes, fish, insects, and the remains of dead animals. They do not let any food go to waste – they eat the bones, tissue, muscles, and organs of their prey.

Like kangaroos and wombats, Tasmanian devils are marsupials. The animals breed once a year in March. After a three-week gestation period, between 20 and 30 rice-sized young are born. The young, called imps, must race to their mother’s pouch to claim one of her four teats; the majority are too slow and do not survive. The young devils stay in their mother’s pouch for four months, after which they are carried on their mother’s back. The young are fully grown after about nine months.

While in the mid 1990s, there was a surge in the Tasmanian devil population, that time period also coincided with the appearance of a disease called devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). This cancerous disease causes tumors to form on the animal’s face, which makes it difficult for it to eat, leading to starvation. Since 2001, the Tasmanian devil population has declined 60 percent.

Scientists are working to save the species from extinction. To do so, they are sequestering healthy populations to prevent the spread of disease. They are also focusing on captive-breeding programs. Currently, over 20 Australian organizations are involved in captive-breeding efforts and more than 600 Tasmanian devils have been bred in captivity.

More to Explore
Tasmanian Devil Natural History
Tasmanian Devil FAQs
Save the Tasmanian Devil
National Geographic: Tasmanian Devil

Country: Australia
Location: Australia is located on the Oceania continent, which is found between the Indian Ocean and the South Pacific Ocean.
Area: 7,741,220 sq km (land and water) (slightly smaller than the 48 contiguous United States)
Climate: Arid to semi-arid; temperate in the southern and eastern portions of the country and tropical in the northern portions of the country
Terrain: Mainly low desert plateaus; fertile plains in the southeast
Natural Resources: bauxite, coal, copper, diamonds, gold, iron ore, lead, natural gas, nickel, silver, tungsten, uranium, petroleum
Economics: $998.3 billion (est. 2013)
Environmental Issues: Soil erosion, urbanization, desertification, habitat destruction (land and marine)
Source:
CIA – The World Factbook